Tuesday, July 26, 2016

Leading like a marine

Sometimes it seems like there are more leadership techniques, books, and mantras than there are boxes of tissues in the world. But there’s one method used by the U.S. Marine Corps that does a good job of covering all the bases of great leadership.

Like many things in the military, the U.S. Marine Corps’ leadership traits can be remembered using an acronym. JJ-DIDTIEBUCKLE stands for: Justice, Judgement, Dependability, Initiative, Decisiveness, Tact, Integrity, Enthusiasm, Bearing, Unselfishness, Courage, Knowledge, Loyalty, and Endurance. To the Corps, these are the characteristics that define a good leader. They’re also traits that good business leaders exhibit and how they inspire those around them. These traits can earn you the respect of those you lead and help propel your business forward.  

Barry LaBov
LABOV Marketing Communications and Training


Tuesday, July 12, 2016

What is collaboration?

I think collaboration is a misunderstood word. There are two definitions for the word. Here is the first:

1.  the action of working with someone to produce or create something.

The second definition is quite different:

2.  traitorous cooperation with an enemy.

How often do we avoid collaboration with a co-worker to do something great (definition #1) because we are concerned that we won’t get credit or don’t want someone else involved (definition #2)?

True collaboration has the goal of creating something great, period. To do that, we have to be vulnerable—to new ideas, to being proven wrong and to sharing the joy of that creation. The only “enemy” involved is us—our pride, selfishness or insecurity that stops us from doing it.

Barry LaBov
LABOV Marketing Communications and Training

Tuesday, June 28, 2016

Measured fashion

It’s funny, when business is slow, it’s so tough to pick it up. It takes forever. Things just won’t progress in a measured way. You go for months with no progress. Then…

You have a great success and all of a sudden, you have to deal with a number of issues, because success didn’t come in a measured fashion, either.

Barry LaBov
LABOV Marketing Communications and Training