Saturday, November 7, 2015

Failing good, part III

Being too afraid to fail will lead to avoiding risk, which drastically reduces the number of opportunities available to us. Being overly concerned about risk stifles creativity and prevents us from realizing the big successes that might be on the horizon. Risk-aversion essentially places us in shackles—we can’t move forward, we can’t grow, we can’t live. We are stuck.

Conversely, failure is freeing. When we fail, what we’ve dreaded has happened, but we’re still alive (hopefully). Failure opens up a realm of possibilities for how to move forward—if we have the tenacity to try again.

Barry LaBov
LABOV Marketing Communications and Training



Saturday, October 24, 2015

Failing good, part II

Failure makes us use our imaginations, our creativity, our intelligence to determine what went wrong and make corrections. It can give us crucial feedback that helps us cultivate better attempts at succeeding not only in the area where we failed, but in other areas as well. When we refuse to learn from failures, blame others or blame the circumstances surrounding us, the failure becomes truly futile and immensely frustrating. There are surely times when failure is a result of forces out of our control, but that doesn’t mean the opportunity to learn something from it is lost. It's when we use failures to learn that they become a useful tool for growth.


Barry LaBov
LABOV Marketing Communications and Training



Saturday, October 10, 2015

Failing good, part I

Everyone fails at one time or another. Steven Spielberg was rejected by the University of Southern California School of Cinematic Arts three times. The Beatles were dropped by their record label when first starting out and told they had no future in show business. Michael Jordan was cut from his high school basketball team. Hard to believe these megastars ever had a failure in their lives, but it happens to us all—and we don’t like it. Not in work, not in our personal lives. So hearing that failure can be a good thing sounds bogus…but it has validity.

Oftentimes we fail when we try something the first time. Hitting a baseball on the first pitch, learning to ride a bike, selling a new product to a customer. So knowing that fact, failure should be no big deal, right? Reality is that it’s difficult to realize in the moment that failure is what can lead to success. The sting of failure can take over. But without failing, we would never be driven to reassess how we approach things or learn how to do them better. Improvement would be obsolete and so would we. 


Barry LaBov
LABOV Marketing Communications and Training